Wide debate that went on internationally about comprehensive trade and investment treaties negotiated during past years has given rise to justified queries.
Is the logic underpinning such treaties politically, economically and socially tenable under conditions of globalisation?
No matter what one may think about Canada – and I have always been one of its admirers – the same doubts and questionings apply to the comprehensive agreement drafted with it.
Its acceptance would serve as a precedent and model for the adoption of other comprehensive agreements with other trade blocs.
In the circumstances it makes sense to take a step back and see whether the institutional and legal foundations for such a ground breaking exercise really exist.
On the other hand it is also true that the process of negotiation is now well advanced.
One could reasonably claim that doubts and fears are being expressed at too late a stage.
There must be a way, not necessarily the one indicated in this resolution, by which to review whether the agreement with Canada could simply serve as curtain raiser to a development by which we will be promoting the oligopolisation of global markets.